Free Speech in School The Importance of Speech and Objectivity: Part 1 By Courtney Duke Graves Since the ratification of the Constitution, America has enjoyed a level of free speech unseen in many parts of the world. Laws and movements threatening to stifle this right crop up from time to time, but we rely on […]

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iPads in Schools: Pros and Cons

iPads in Schools: Pros and Cons How much technology is too much? Some things about the back to school days never change. Teachers are still asking for #2 pencils and composition notebooks. Parents are still taking photos of their kids as they get on the bus for the first day. But some things have changed: […]

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What Happened to Block Scheduling?

What Happened to Block Scheduling Might I suggest a visit to our school? A guest post by Ann Michaelsen I just read this article: “Fiddling with Time in Classrooms” by Larry Cuban, and found it quite interesting. First of all, block scheduling in the USA seems to be very different from what we do in […]

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How to reverse the summer brain drain and still have fun

How to Reverse the Summer Brain Drain Three Sure-Fire Ways to Get Your Child Motivated and Excited Summer’s coming to a close, vacation trips are over, and back-to-school gear is popping up in all the stores. More important than your kid having the right three-ring binder and matching notebooks is that they have the right […]

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photo credit: marcoverch A giant storm on Neptune is disappearing and for the first time scientists are able to see it via photopin (license)

Childhood Speech Disorders Part 2: Three Common Mistakes in Therapy For most of my childhood, I had problems with my speech. As mentioned in Part 1, speech errors are normal while children are first learning to talk, but the errors should resolve themselves naturally by the time the child is in kindergarten. My errors, however, […]

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Childhood Speech Disorders Part 1: Understanding the Basics

Childhood Speech Disorders Part 1: Understanding the Basics Speech-language impairment has been called the “most common and least diagnosed disability of childhood,” affecting approximately one in every 12 children. 46 percent of children enrolled in early intervention programs have communication impairments, while 26 percent have developmental delays in multiple areas, usually including language skills (NIH). […]

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The Effects of Reading to Infants

The Effects of Reading to Infants Reading and the Link Between Language Development We’ve all heard the saying, “start them young.” These days, the starting point for formal education is getting younger and younger. People are buying computer coding books for babies and sending three-year-olds to prestigious preschools for $43,600 a year. But don’t worry. […]

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The Homeschooler’s Balancing Act: Grade Level

If there’s one question a homeschooled kid can’t easily answer, it’s what grade they’re in. Sure, your six-year-old is reading at a third-grade level and can identify every species of dinosaur known to man, but a math lesson designed for one day takes them two or three days to complete. The biggest advantage to homeschool […]

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Navigating the “Phonics Versus Whole Language” Debate

Did you know the way you teach a child to read could incite people to label you as an ideological extremist? It may sound too ridiculous to be true, but there is a politically driven and very real “reading war” among educators that has lasted over half a century. The two sides: phonics-based and meaning-based […]

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Teaching ESL students

Teaching ESL students Advice for parents and educators Teaching is hard, period. You know this whether you’re a public school teacher or a homeschooling parent. You take on an enormous workload, pull long hours with little or no compensation, and always need to present yourself with a fresh face, whether you’re truly happy or not. […]

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